Pen News

I know you’ve been dying to know about the pen purchase the other day, and I finally remembered to take a pic to show off my new proudly acquired little writing friend. Here she is:

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Ahhh. Hello, my little sweetness.

This is a Pilot Metropolitan with a fine nib in gold brush finish. It’s the same model as my previous ink pen purchase last year, a pen that I have fallen head over heels in love with and that I adore. Another plus: I even use it for most of my notes at work meetings and similar so it’s not something that just sits around being neglected.

It’s perfectly balanced for my hand, a joy to write with, and might even improve my handwriting a bit, all of which to say is a miracle if you ask me. I also ordered the little cubist pen case (or as it was called in England in my youth a pencil case) in a color which just makes me smile when I see it at meetings. The ink is pink. Perhaps not the most professional color ink to use, but as it’s my pen and my writing, I am planning on using this when my current cartridge runs out. I’m wondering how pink is pink…

The fine nib makes a difference as well. I like the medium nib, it’s true, but sometimes only a fine nib will do the trick. (You know you’re OCD* about pens and ink when this is a concern to you in your daily life!) This combined w my Moleskin notebooks makes me a very happy person…

Does anyone else have a thing about ink pens? Or any pens? Or office stationary? Please say yes. 🙂

P.S. Completely unrelated to the topic of post, but dying to know anyway: Has anyone see the AbsFab movie? I keep hoping it’s going to come to my city, but the odds are going down week by week. 😦

  • Not to make light of a serious condition. My sister and I both have some tendencies and we call it “Overly Caring” instead of the slightly judgy tone of “Obsessive Compulsive.” It works for us. 🙂

Readings: Essays and Literary Entertainments – Michael Dirda (2000)

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Having just finished up Michael Dirda’s book of essays about books, I feel quite bereft for several reasons, really. One is that no matter how hard I try, I will not reach his level of literary achievements – He seems to have a familiarity with every title out there, no matter how far back you go. Second – he writes extremely well about what he reads (without a trace of boasting about the sheer numbers), and three, he’s been awarded the Pulitzer Prize, and finally, four, he seems to be a nice all-around guy.

In case you’re not up on who Dirda is, he is the Washington Post’s Senior Book Critic and he has a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Cornell University.  He’s also incredibly well read, and I’ve dipped into his erudite blog (now defunct), but you can see more of his writing via The American Scholar’s Browsing column. I’ve enjoyed almost everything I’ve read by him so far. I own three of his books (Readings (2000), Bound to Please (2005), and Book by Book (2005)) but have only read this title so far. (Read quite a few of his columns though.) However, he definitely meets the self-determined criteria of one of my famed literary dinner party guests. (Guests so far include Nick Hornby, Robert Lacey and Dirda. Hmm. I clearly need to balance up the table a bit in terms of gender and POC… I’ll work on that.)

Basically, this book is a collection of essays and columns from his writing at the Washington Post, and in the same vein as Nick Hornby (except a little more elevated, one might say). Hornby’s easier to read and pretty funny, whilst Dirda is much more scholarly and serious. Both are good in different ways – just depends what you’re in the mood for, really. Just be prepared to add oodles of titles to your TBR list.

So this collection covers a wide range of topics, from the challenge of getting his three young boys to read more to the writings of Sophocles to the book-buying adventures in which he engages every now and then. As a bookie person, I really enjoyed each column but must be candid and admit that there were quite a few titles of which I had never heard. (Boy – he seems to have read everything and remembers what he read as well!)

I particularly liked his quote about traveling:

“A good rule of thumb is: Pack twice as many books as changes of underwear.”

Sounds rather sensible to me.

So – if you like books about books, or reading about books, and enjoy adding five million titles to your TBR, then I highly recommend Dirda’s columns. I really enjoyed this read, and now moving the other two titles up the pile a bit. (Want to spread them out a bit so I can look forward to them. Plus he has a new title coming out in 2015. Joy.)

 

ALERT: Broken Spell Check and Strange Grammar Outbreak…

These are just some of the signs that I’ve spotted about town in the past few weeks… Enjoy!

Annnyone for a game?

Annnyone for a game?

Oh, semi-colons. Use with caution. Just because you can doesn't mean you should...

Oh, semi-colons. Use with caution. Just because you can doesn’t mean you should…

Quotation mark abuse that had to be documented...

Quotation mark abuse that had to be documented…

Sign from a doctor's office -- shimpering, anyone?

Sign from a doctor’s office — shimpering, anyone?

And a slightly odd thing to put on your car:

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Recap: 2015 Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference

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As part of my job and life, I write any number of documents, reports, PR materials and numerous other pieces, so it’s important that I try to learn as much as I can to develop my skills. Luckily, I love to learn and when I was offered the chance to attend a prestigious writing conference near Dallas, I jumped at it.

The Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference is an annual event organized by the Mayborn School of Journalism (or J-School as it’s known) at the University of North Texas. It’s been going on for quite some time, and has evolved into a pretty important literary event for those in the world of nonfiction (especially narrative NF, creative NF, long-form NF, literary NF or any of its other permutations). The conference’s theme was “The Great Divide” which covered, as the conference brochure says, “the great divide between the Haves and the Have-Nots in America and the social, economic, racial, cultural and political fissures created by this divide.”

Speakers were heavy hitters in the world of lit NF: there were keynotes from Anne Fadiman and from Barbara Ehrenreich, there were editors and writers of all levels from places like the Washington Post, New York Times, and The Atlantic magazine, and there were Pulitzer Prize winners talking about their work.

There were panel conversations about the ethics of writing someone else’s story (as happens with lit NF many times): should a writer appropriate the life story belonging to someone else and if so, what is the obligation (if there is one) of the writer to that someone during the process and afterwards (in terms of literary success etc.)?

There was one particularly interesting panel about a young journalist (actually on the panel) who had made a colossal mistake with a story, an error which may have played a role in the source’s eventual suicide. Who should have stopped the error? The journalist himself? His editors? In the end, twelve people read the story prior to print and no one said anything to stop it being published as it was written. How did that occur?

Another panel discussed the rights and wrongs involved in Rolling Stone’s wrongly reported fraternity rape case at a Virginia university. So many people were involved in the process, but somehow the source’s story didn’t get fact-checked… How? Why?

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It was a very thought-provoking two days and I learned a great deal, one of the biggest being that every lit NF (whether it’s a book or a short-form article) has a formal structure to it (thanks to good editors if you have one) and I’m slowly deconstructing essays and other documents to see how they are built within these structures.  I think that you have to know the rules to break the rules (re: grammar and other writing bits and pieces). This deconstructing process reminds me of diagraming sentences so if you liked to do that, then you’ll probably enjoy deconstructing essays. It’s great fun on long plane rides, if you ask me.

So – not only was the conference worthwhile, but being in Dallas meant that I was pretty close to lots of friends who live in the area so I managed to catch up with some of them in the scant free time there was. I might also have found a bookshop very close to the hotel. I can neither confirm nor deny that books were bought on this trip.

Anyway, a good trip and well worth the time and effort. You should look it up if you’re interested in lit NF, reading or writing it.

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New things…

Pen_inkIt’s been a busy last few days (and weeks) for me, so much so that I’ve finally come to the realization that I’m not going to be able to pick up the amount of reading that I was enjoying back before my promotion. Less reading will probably translate into fewer titles on my blog, so I hope you are OK with that. I used to be able to juggle one classic, one non-fiction title, and one fiction title all at the same time, but sadly, I must cut back out of necessity.

So – I’m back to reading one title at a time (instead of multi-tasking) and I’m actually fine with that. I’m enjoying what I’m reading as I go, AND I even returned all my library books as they were just sitting in a pile haunting me about not spending time with them. So – now, I feel as though I have more space in my head for the things that I can and need to fit in there. It’s a really good feeling.

You know that I’m all about words and writing, and so to support my writing a bit more (and to see if I can curb my absolutely terrible handwriting), I have plunked down some cash for a new fabulous ink pen, cartridges, and a snazzy Moleskin note book.

I have been yearning for a posh Moleskin notebook for ages, but couldn’t fork over the cash (read: too mean), but I won a gift certificate in a photography exhibition and used that to purchase the pen and notebook. And wow. Do I love writing with my ink pen…

It flows so smoothly and I just love to write with it. With the ink being what it is, I have found out that I need to write on some pretty nice thick paper (or it comes through to the back page) and there comes in the Moleskin notebook. Fountain pen + lovely notebook… Oh joy and be still my heart.

Anyway, I haven’t forsaken the reading word and I certainly haven’t forsaken the written word. I just have to balance my life at the moment in terms of cutting back on titles a bit.

And – if you haven’t tried a fountain pen since your messy-fingered* youth, I recommend taking another look at it.

It’s really fun now.

* That might have been only me who got ink over everything though. 🙂